Tribute to Avicii - Kaleidoscope Orchestra
07:59
Kaleidoscope Orchestra

Tribute to Avicii - Kaleidoscope Orchestra

Follow us on instagram ▶ https://goo.gl/H7UVDB Like our Facebook Page ▶ https://goo.gl/Tq77gT Subscribe to our channel ▶ https://goo.gl/HRVsRS ‘But you musicians have the best job in the world, how could you possibly be depressed?’ Sound familiar? Whether or not you’ve thought or heard something like this, the fact remains that 71% of musicians believe they have experienced anxiety or panic attacks and 65% report that they have at some point suffered from depression*. This week is Mental Health Awareness week, and here at Kaleidoscope Orchestra we’re marking it with a suite based on tunes by the late Swedish DJ and producer, Avicii. Musicians’ mental health is becoming a topic of increased interest, and Avicii’s story is one that resonated with musicians worldwide back in April, when he was found dead at the age of just 28. He appeared to have it all: millions of fans, huge worldwide hits, festival bookings across the globe. However, out of the spotlight, his family tell a different story, describing him as an ‘over-achieving perfectionist,’ who ‘could not go on any longer.’ Before retiring from touring, Avicii would often play two shows in one night, despite reportedly never liking being in the spotlight. The music may be different, but classical musicians and pop musicians have many things in common: whilst perfectionism often drives us, it can be the thing most holding us back. Many aspiring and professional musicians have a ‘binge-purge work schedule,’- times where there’s barely time to eat between gigs … and times where there’s barely money to eat between gigs. Perfectionism and uncertainty of work, combined with antisocial working hours and the attitude that ‘musicians shouldn’t be depressed,’ creates a culture of silence that can be, and needs to be broken. We love our jobs, but let’s keep breaking the silence around musicians’ mental health. 0808 802 8008: Music Minds Matter, a 24/7 mental health helpline for the whole music community. 116 123: Samaritans, a general mental health helpline if you need someone to talk to. Visit Mind.org.uk or time-to-change.org.uk for general mental health advice. Also BBC Newsbeat just launched a new helpline for people in the music industry https://goo.gl/iq84Wh *Source: Help Musicians UK: Can music make you sick? (2016) 2211 respondents. In memory of Avicii. 1:51 - Music Starts 2:20 - Wake Me Up 3:41 - Levels 4:08 - Hey Brother 4:59 - The Nights 5:36 - Without You 6:35 - Wake Me Up / Hey Brother / Levels Music arranged by Steve Pycroft www.stevepycroft.com Video shot and edited by Steve Pycroft Orchestra: Flutes – Jenny Dyson, Jenna Thackray Oboes – Bea Hubble, Mikey Sluman Clarinets – Harry Michalas, Kate Blackstone Bassoons – Hugh Wooley, Dan Plant Horns - Rupert Browne, Calum Ward Trumpets - Lucian Amos, Mark Harrison Trombones - Dan Mitchell, Rich McVeigh Percussion – Jack McCarthy Violins - Simmy Singh, Lucy McKay, Andra Vornicu, Ruth Sanderson, Matthew Chadbond, Madeline Fitzgerald Violas – Rhiannon James, Sophia Dignam, Sam Chilvers Cellos – Ali Howes, Miriam Brown, Alice Luddington Double Basses – Joshua Cavanagh-Brierley, Lucy Hibberd MD – Steve Pycroft Engineered by Mark Lewis Mixed and Mastered by John Davies